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2013 Premier's Sustainability Awards winners and finalists

The winners and finalists were announced at a gala dinner at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre on Friday 14 June, view a photo gallery from the event.

Premier's Award

Winner Premier's Award (L-R) former Premier Campbell Newman, Professor Paul Meredith, and Bruce Mitchell, Owner and Managing Director, Mitchell Builders.

Winner Premier's Award (L-R) former Premier Campbell Newman, Professor Paul Meredith, and Bruce Mitchell, Owner and Managing Director, Mitchell Builders.

Winner

Professor Paul Meredith

Professor Paul Meredith is a materials physicist and senior research fellow with the University of Queensland based in Brisbane.

He is a Queensland State Fellow and co-founder of the award winning solar coatings company, Xerocoat.

He presently leads an internationally recognised materials physics group using laser science in projects such as organic solar cells and plastic electronics.

His team is investigating new sustainable high tech materials for applications such as more efficient production of solar energy.

From 2009, Professor Meredith has led the development of an innovative solar photovoltaic Micro-Grid system which contains the largest PV flat panel array in Australia. It is now recognised as one of the most sophisticated solar-systems in the world.

His passion is to solve the world's energy and greenhouse gas problems using alternative energy technology.

Minister's Award for Leadership in Sustainability

Winner Ministers Award for Leadership (L-R) former Minister Andrew Powell, Mayor Bundaberg Cr Mal Forman, James Stanfield, Manager Waste and Recycling Bundaberg Regional Council, and Bruce Munro, Managing Director of Thiess.

Winner Ministers Award for Leadership (L-R) former Minister Andrew Powell, Mayor Bundaberg Cr Mal Forman, James Stanfield, Manager Waste and Recycling Bundaberg Regional Council, and Bruce Munro, Managing Director of Thiess.

Winner

Bundaberg Regional Council

Three consecutive natural disasters over the 2013 Australia Day long weekend, left more than 4, 500 Bundaberg premises flooded. Council responded by positioning waste minimisation at the heart of the town’s recovery.

Three temporary disaster waste stockpile stations were established, where teams sorted the immense amount of disaster waste—enabling the waste to be reused and recycled. BRC extracted mattresses, roofing and fencing metals, whitegoods, tyres, green waste, and gas bottles. Of the 65,000 tonnes of additional waste generated from the disasters Council has recycled an estimated 30,000 tonnes.

Finalist

Mackay Regional Council

Mackay Regional Council is committed to finding practical and effective ways to reduce its impact on the environment by reducing its corporate greenhouse gas emissions.

Council’s Sustainable Futures Advisory Committee is committed to actively building and strengthening a culture of sustainability across five working groups which are introducing practises that reduce Council’s carbon footprint. Sustainability is now embedded into everyday decision making across all management levels.

Finalist

University of the Sunshine Coast

The environment has been a primary consideration throughout the University's development. Its grounds are a flora and fauna reserve, spread over 100 hectares adjoining the Mooloolah River National Park.

To minimise impact on the sensitive National Park, the University has instilled a philosophy of sustainable operations through its Master Plan.

All buildings on campus focus on environmentally sustainable design to suit the sub-tropical climate of the Sunshine Coast. These include passive lighting and natural ventilation to minimise the use of non-renewable energy, extensive use of screens, sun shelters and tree plantings to reduce direct sunlight on buildings, and locating buildings to take advantage of prevailing breezes.

The buildings on campus have received more than 30 awards for planning, architecture and construction.

School Award

Winner School Award L-R former Premier Campbell Newman, Bulimba State School representatives Michael Zeuschner, Principal, Sheryl Kennedy, Deputy-Principal, and Sonya Trau, President P and C, Ross Thompson, GM External Affairs and Planning, Glencore.

Winner School Award L-R former Premier Campbell Newman, Bulimba State School representatives Michael Zeuschner, Principal, Sheryl Kennedy, Deputy-Principal, and Sonya Trau, President P and C, Ross Thompson, GM External Affairs and Planning, Glencore.

Winner

Bulimba State School

Bulimba State School’s long term commitment to reducing its impact on the environment spans more than 15 years. Teachers and students believe that sustainability is not just about saving energy, water or reducing waste—its about meeting the needs of the present without compromising the future.

The school uses a large area for edible gardens, and outdoor learning classrooms where students learn from practical experiences and make decisions which impact the school environment.

Finalist

Hermit Park State School

Hermit Park fuses traditional learning with environmental activities and experiences.

Students collect eggs from chickens, honey from native bees, have established a vegetable patch, and make fresh lemon grass tea from herbs.  

The school’s idealic bushland setting ensures the students are surrounded by chickens, worms, butterflies, possums, cockatoos, owls, native birds, and frogs.

It has reduced its water and electricity use considerably over the last two years, and minimised waste output.

Finalist

Boronia Heights State School

The school aims to be an Earth Smart School by empowering students to take ownership of local initiatives that reduce its carbon footprint. Students are given leadership opportunities at all ages ranging from class eco Captains, Power Rangers, and Earth Keepers.

Boronia’s environmental leadership course, Earthkeepers has been conducted at Wild Mountains for the last 6 years.

Students have established links with local mentors from Logan City Council, Toohey and Jacobs Well Environment Centre, Wild Mountains, and the Logan Eco Festival to help introduce a culture of sustainable living into the school.

Community Award

Winner Community Award (L-R) former Premier Campbell Newman, Barton Green, Chairman, Business South Bank, and Joel Jessup, State Manager of Bendigo Bank.

Winner Community Award (L-R) former Premier Campbell Newman, Barton Green, Chairman, Business South Bank, and Joel Jessup, State Manager of Bendigo Bank.

Winner

Business South Bank 

Business South Bank established a specialised committee in 2008 to concentrate on introducing sustainability into the South Bank precinct’s everyday business.

The group established an annual sustainability award and commissioned Australia's first precinct-wide sustainability audit.  A follow up audit last year, revisited energy and potable water usage as well as measuring waste, recycling, transport and the integration of sustainable practices.

The precinct has achieved significant savings in energy and potable water use, and is far in advance of the Brisbane average in usage of public transport and in waste management.

Finalist

Tagai State College

48 strategically placed community gardens of tropical fruit trees have been established on Thursday Island as part of Tagai State College’s Healthy Communities project.

Water is sourced from a nearby dam and the generous application of recycled mulch, lock in the moisture while keeping the soil cool.

Finalist

Trinity Beach State School

The Bikebus is a fun and safe cycling program that enables large groups of young school children to ride safely to school.  The Bikebus is in its fifth year of operation and runs a set route two days a week all year round, picking children up on their bikes from designated stops.

90 children attend each session and are taught road safety and fitness skills, as well as participating in an activity that reduces the school’s carbon footprint.

Built Environment Award

Winner Built Environment Award (L-R) Mary-Lou Kelly and David Baggs, Directors and Co-Founders, Global Green Tag, and Dylan Byrne, Director of CitySmart.

Winner Built Environment Award (L-R) Mary-Lou Kelly and David Baggs, Directors and Co-Founders, Global Green Tag, and Dylan Byrne, Director of CitySmart.

Winner

Global GreenTag Certification Program

Global GreenTag is a unique, world first Queensland based green building and product certification program that provides easy to understand product labelling.

GreenTag makes green building product selection easy based on a 'Bronze, Silver, Gold and Platinum' category - all backed up by scientific data.

The program is aimed at conscious consumers to architects, designers, builders and procurement professionals, and already endorses over 700 building products.

Finalist

Thiess and Leighton Properties

Thiess and Leighton Properties ‘King George Central’ is a 6 Star Green Star rated commercial office development showcasing cutting-edge design innovation and world class environmentally sustainable solutions.

The landmark 27 storey tower is the first project in Australia to be publicly supported by the Heart Foundation for its ‘Healthy by Design’ features that consider the health and well-being of its occupants.

Finalist

Norman Disney & Young (NDY)

In 2008, NDY was commissioned an energy assessment and upgrade report of their ageing 1980’s commercial building tower at 215 Adelaide Street in Brisbane’s CBD.

A comprehensive $5.4million upgrade in 2010 included thermal energy modelling, and the installation of the latest tracking technology which lifted the buildings energy Star rating from 2.5 to a 5 Star rating in 2013.

This is an equivalent energy savings of power needed to run 500 typical households.

Business Eco-efficiency Award

Winner of the Business Eco-efficiency Award from (L-R) former Minister Andrew Powell, Charlie Foxall, Health, Safety and Environment Manager, Carlton and United Breweries and David Kassulke AJ Bush (podium).

Winner of the Business Eco-efficiency Award from (L-R) former Minister Andrew Powell, Charlie Foxall, Health, Safety and Environment Manager, Carlton and United Breweries and David Kassulke AJ Bush (podium).

Winner

AJ Bush & Sons

AJ Bush and Sons operates the most advanced, state-of-the-art manufacturing plant for meat by-products in Australasia.

The plant processes over 800 tonnes of animal by-products daily and remains 100% Australian owned and operated by the Bush Family.

Waste water from the rendering process is directed to a number of covered anaerobic lagoons. Here, it produces methane gas which is collected to power two 500 kilowatt generators to produce a third of the electricity used on site.

Finalist

Xstrata Copper, Ernest Henry Mining

Xstrata’s Ernest Henry Mining operation is a copper, gold and magnetite mining and processing operation near Cloncurry.

Its new $80 million Magnetite Extraction Plant now allows magnetite to be recovered from  waste tailings and sold on as an important by-product. Magnetite has traditionally been discarded as waste, but this new extraction process has reduced the volume of waste tailings sent to an on-site storage facility by 20 per cent.

Xstrata Copper became Queensland's first magnetite concentrate exporter in June 2011 when the first shipment of magnetite concentrate departed bound for Asia.

Finalist

Sofitel Brisbane Central

From 2011, Sofitel’s Energy Conservation, and Environmental Health Committees have led a major drive to reduce the hotel’s energy consumption.

A specialist consultant was engaged to monitor the luxury hotels 21 energy meters 24/7 and review its daily energy use to assist staff respond to any abnormalities with energy consumption in different areas of the hotel. The hotel’s chief engineer reviews the electricity performance and works with the team members in focusing on areas that need any special attention

The hotel saved over 1 million kilowatt hours of electricity over 2011.

Small Business Award

Winner of the Small Business Award (L-R) former Minister Andrew Powell, Ron Birkett of Daintree Discovery Centre, and Jann Stuckey Minister for Small Business.

Winner of the Small Business Award (L-R) former Minister Andrew Powell, Ron Birkett of Daintree Discovery Centre, and Jann Stuckey Minister for Small Business.

Winner

Daintree Discovery Centre

The award winning Daintree Discovery Centre’s 23m Canopy Tower, spectacular aerial walkway, and audio guides, allows visitors to experience the ancient Daintree rainforest without setting foot in the forest.

Nestled in the heart of north Queensland’s Daintree, this accredited Wet Tropics Visitor Information Centre is an industry leader in low-impact, sustainable ecotourism. Everything is built off the ground to protect the fragile forest and to preserve wildlife corridors.

Finalist

Buyequip

Buyequip collects electronic IT waste from businesses across Queensland and recycles their components.  Much of this would otherwise be sent to landfill or directly into the recycling channel limiting any reuse, and risking the chance of heavy metals leaching into the environment. 

Once collected, checked and processed, the equipment typically goes to under privileged people around the world unable to afford IT equipment.

Buyequip has diverted hundred of tonnes of eWaste from Ipswich City Council's landfill over the last 3 years

Finalist

Ocean Safari

Ocean Safari offers half day eco-tours to the pristine Mackay and Undine Reefs just off the Daintree Coast at Cape Tribulation, in north Queensland.

This is the only place in the world where two world heritage sites lay side by side.

Ocean Safari has Advanced Ecotourism Certification.

A maximum of 25 passengers each trip are taken to by an experienced Skipper and Eco Hosts to snorkel and explore the extraordinary array of marine life and coral species.

Innovation in Sustainable Technologies Award

Winner Innovation in Sustainable Technologies Award (L-R) former Premier Campbell Newman, Carol Dickenson, Acting Vice Chancellor, QUT, and Jason Perkins, Tractile.

Winner Innovation in Sustainable Technologies Award (L-R) former Premier Campbell Newman, Carol Dickenson, Acting Vice Chancellor, QUT, and Jason Perkins, Tractile.

Winner

Tractile

Tractile is the world’s first interlocking roofing system to include solar energy features into a roofing tile. The interlocking tile concept ensures minimal effort to lay the roof, less battens and cyclone like wind resistance.

It integrates high performance composite materials with solar photovoltaic technology to produce electricity to meet the growing worldwide demand for sustainable and energy efficient buildings.

The roofing system is extremely durable and takes significantly less carbon dioxide to produce and install compared with conventional concrete tiles and colorbond roofs.

Finalist

Enviroconcept

EnviroConcept is Australia’s leading designer, manufacturer and installer of environmentally friendly, portable wash bays for 4WD’s, trucks, buses, and heavy equipment.

The bays incorporate a water reuse plant that recycles wash water, are quick to install and cost-effective to operate, and can be moved from work site to site.

Companies no longer need to transport and pour expensive concrete to build in-ground washbays only to demolish them at the end of a project.

Finalist

Q Solar

Energy used in industry is primarily obtained from heat generated by the burning of fossil fuels in cold air. This process generates large amounts of greenhouse gas.

Q Solar air heaters are the first renewable energy devices to provide clean heat for medium and large scale applications at lower prices than heat produced from fossil fuels.

The new heaters have multiple applications in industry, agriculture and for the heating of all size buildings. The new application involves the preheating of air fed to fossil fuel burners – this way less fossil fuel is needed to create the same amount of heat. It also reduces the amount of greenhouse gas produced.

Rural Award

Winner Rural Award (L-R) Mark Scates Coles Retail General Manager, Rita Papale, former Minister Andrew Powell, David Foote CEO Australian Country Choice, and Vince Papale (podium).

Winner Rural Award (L-R) Mark Scates Coles Retail General Manager, Rita Papale, former Minister Andrew Powell, David Foote CEO Australian Country Choice, and Vince Papale (podium).

Winner

Vince and Rita Papale

The Papale’s farm at Home Hill is a model of best practice for the sugar cane industry farming. The couple use their farm to help educate others about the importance of best management practice farming and its ties to sustainable and productive farming.

The Papale's have implemented a wide range of best practice and sustainability projects on their farm utilising the latest technology and processes, and have transformed 4-hectares of poorly-performing low lands into a highly productive wetland.

Finalist

David Defranciscis

Cane farmer David Defranciscis champions the efficient use of nitrogen fertiliser in the Burdekin region sugarcane industry.

He is chairman of an Industry Reference Group that oversees and recommends appropriate nitrogen application rates. His understanding of the Queensland Government's Reef legislation and potential impacts of run off makes him a vital link between the Burdekin sugar industry, BSES researchers, and government decision makers.

Finalist

RED Valley Swiss Farms

The Inderbitzin family have modified their two banana farms, Red Valley and Swiss Farms, to adopt more sustainable farming practises.

A state-of-the-art packing facility, the first of their kind in Australia, has increased productivity by 40%. A new cableway harvesting system, the only one of its kind in Australia, has increased yield by 25% and reduced waste from 30 to 7%.

Banana, animal and green waste is composted and applied back onto the farms. This has reduced the amount of chemical fertilizers used by 50%.

Last updated
16 August 2016